Episode #113–You Can’t Trust Everything on the Web

13 April, 2015No comments

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On this episode of Digital Campus, host Mills Kelly, along with Dan Cohen, Amanda French, and Stephen Robertson discuss the role of technology in the classroom and some of history’s most teachable moments courtesy of the US Postal Service.

To begin, everyone weighs in on the Maya Angelou stamp controversy and whether or not quotation inaccuracies are getting worse because of the internet.  Then the crew discusses a recent survey by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation which found that only 20% of college and university professors have used “high-tech teaching methods.”  Dan argues that the majority of professors default to textbook teaching just to get the job done. While professors lack digital diversity, the group then shifts to discussing whether the Apple watch could cause problems in the classroom. Could widespread adoption of wearable technology lead to easier cheating? The podcast wrapped up by congratulating Amanda on being elected to the THAT Camp counsel for another year and the announcement that THAT Camp has switched to Reclaim Hosting.

Related Links:

Running time: 41:28

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Categorized under Apple, Apple Watch, teaching, THATCamp, wearable technology

Episode #112 – Digital Campus Classic

23 March, 2015No comments

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Along with Dan Cohen and Tom Scheinfeldt, Mills Kelly hosted this classic episode of Digital Campus devoted entirely to technology. Mills, Dan, and Tom discussed the demise of Internet Explorer and IE’s replacement, Spartan, which is meant to complement and facilitate Microsoft’s new operating system. Then the discussion moved to the Apple watch and how such a technology might be adapted for higher education. In continuing with the Apple theme, Mills, Dan, and Tom then talked about the new MacBook that is going to have only one port. Mills reminded the listeners that Steve Jobs is in fact dead, and that creating a laptop with USB drives is an acceptable enterprise. The podcast wrapped up after Mills brought up the Maker Movements. Digital History Fellows Anne Ladyem McDivitt and Alyssa Toby Fahringer produced this podcast.

Links:

Internet Explorer

Tom Warren, “Microsoft is Killing Off the Internet Explorer Brand,” The Verge, March 17, 2015. 

Apple

Casey Fabris, “What Might an Apple Watch for Higher Education Look Like?” The Chronicle of Higher Education, March 10, 2015. 

Tim Moynihan, “Life with the MacBook’s Single Port Won’t Be Easy – Yet,” Wired, March 16, 2015.

Apple ResearchKit

Chris Mills, “Will.I.Am Finally Found a Customer for his Smartwatch: Gucci,” Gizmodo, March 19, 2015. 

“Apple Introduces Revolutionary New Laptop With No Keyboard,” The Onion.

Maker Faires

NoVa Mini Maker Faire

Maker Faires Around the World

 

Running time: 39:42

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Categorized under Apple, Microsoft

Podcast #111 – The Next Big Thing

23 February, 2015No comments

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After a long break, our podcast regulars, Stephen Robertson and Mills Kelly, were led by Amanda French in our first 2015 podcast. After a quick check-in on their current projects, the group kicked it off with a review of the winter academic conferences. Next, they discussed the announcement that Stanford University Press was awarded funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for the publishing of interactive scholarly works. On the subject of digital scholarship, Amanda mentioned the Humanities Open Book project which was recently funded by both the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the Mellon Foundation. Shifting the discussion to pedagogy, Mills addressed the way in which students may engage with the humanities differently through wearable computing. This podcast was produced by Digital History Fellows Jordan Bratt and Jannelle Legg.

Links:

Stanford University Press

Humanities Open Book

Gluejar

Wearable Computing

Internet of Things

Running time: 45:27

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Categorized under awards, books, conferences, digital humanities, publishing

Episode #110 – 2014 in Review

19 December, 2014No comments

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‘Twas the last podcast of 2014 and on this episode of Digital Campus, Amanda, Tom, Dan, and Stephen discussed their “Cheers and Jeers” for the year (with RRCHNM Digital History Fellow Amanda Regan filling in for Mills).  MLA, IMLS, FCC, and the lack of a government shutdown won the praise of the group, but Twitter could not stand up to the pressures of 2014.

After describing the good and the bad of the year, the group discussed their predictions from 2013.  While Mills’s prediction that an Amazon drone would be shot out of the sky in Texas did not come true, it appears that many of the predictions made by the group last year were pretty close–even though Dan gave himself a solid “B”.  With 2015 quickly approaching, everyone discussed their latest predictions for the new year and where the digital humanities are headed in the next 365 days.

Running time: 48:22

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Categorized under programming, Twitter, year in review

Episode #109 – What Do Fabio and Naked Laptops Have in Common?

18 November, 20141 comment

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This Digital Campus episode was recorded live by Chris Preperato during Friday’s second afternoon session of the RRCHNM’s 20th Anniversary Conference and was produced by Anne Ladyem McDivitt and Alyssa Toby Fahringer. Mills Kelly, Stephen Robertson, and Tom Scheinfeldt joined host Dan Cohen to recap the earlier sessions of the day, including discussions on failure, ECHO, History Makers, pedagogy, and digital humanities centers’ websites. The floor was opened for a question and answer session, and audience participants and those on Twitter asked about Tom’s laptop’s dearth of stickers, how to convey scholarship to a broad audience, and gender and digital history centers.

Links:
Gender and Digital History Centers Google Doc

RRCHNM20 Friday schedule

#RRCHNM20 Twitter stream

RRCHNM20 site

RRCHNM20 Omeka

Running time: 48:10

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Categorized under blogs, conferences, digital humanities, unconferences

Episode #108 – Things That Go Bump in the Night: copyright, interviews and other scary things

3 November, 20142 comments

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For this episode, Tom Scheinfeld led our podcast regulars, Dan Cohen, Stephen Robertson, Amanda French, and Mills Kelly, in a Halloween episode produced by Jordan Bratt and Jannelle Legg. After a brief discussion of Halloween plans, the group delved into the subject of copyright and creative commons as Dan described the DPLA’s involvement in an international rights meeting in Amsterdam. The discussion then led to the recent Harvard decision and the complexity of digital surrogates, creative commons, and institutional holdings. Next, Mills directed the group to the ongoing Georgia State E-reserves court case and the challenges facing public universities in the handling of copyright materials. From one scary topic to the next, Amanda introduced the subject of job interviews conducted at annual conferences and a recent publication by the MLA Executive Director, Rosemary Feal. Skype and other technologies were also addressed as the group reminisced about their experiences on both sides of the interview process. The podcast wrapped up with a shout out to a podcast listener, Allen Riddell and his Novels Project. Links: Harvard Library Lifts Restrictions on Digital Reproductions of Works in the Public Domain:

Georgia State E-reserve and fair use court cases:

MLA Skype interviews:

Running time: 54:10 Download the .mp3

Categorized under Uncategorized

Episode #107 — An Easter Basket of Hugs

7 October, 2014No comments

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In this episode, regulars Mills Kelly, Dan Cohen, and Stephen Robertson were joined by special guest Sharon Leon, the Director of Public Projects at RRCHNM, along with the digital history fellows, Amanda Reagan and Stephanie Seal.  We picked up where we left off last week with a discussion about Twitter and academic freedom after the dismissal of tenured professor Steven Salaita from the University of Illinois. Then we moved to a discussion on the future of Learning Management Systems and their role in academic institutions, as well as praise for the new online journal JSTOR Daily. Our last topic of discussion surrounded the ever ongoing question of whether or not those in the digital humanities should to learn how to code.  This conversation was spurred by the new platform Exercism that teaches users to code by encouraging more experienced programmers to provide feedback on a user’s code.   We wrapped up the discussion with news from Sharon Leon about upcoming Omeka enhancements, upgrades, and features.

 

Links:

Academic Freedom and Twitter

Educause Learning Management Systems Report

JSTOR Daily 

Exercism.io

Omeka Enhancements, Upgrades, and New Features

Running time: 55:25
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Categorized under Blackboard, digital humanities, freedom of speech, GitHub, journals, JSTOR, Omeka, open access, open source, programming, social networking, Twitter

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