Episode 02 – The Old and the YouTube

21 March, 20073 comments

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In our second podcast, we revisit the debate over Wikipedia, including hearing from Mills about how Cambodians are using it (and whether you can find a WiFi signal in the jungle of Cambodia). Our feature story explores whether and how YouTube is useful in the classroom. Links for this week include a podcast on Byzantine rulers, the Documentation Center of Cambodia, and a tool for making timelines. And we make a solemn pledge not to discuss Vista for a long time.

Featuring: Dan Cohen, Mills Kelly, Tom Scheinfeldt

Running time: 43:52

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Categorized under YouTube

3 comments to “Episode 02 – The Old and the YouTube”

  1. YouTube and Education « The Worcester Academy History Department : 26th March, 2007

    […] Published March 26th, 2007 Education and Technology This is a podcast episode on Digital Campus, a website sponsored by The Center for History and New Media Studies and George Mason University. […]

  2. Sage Ross : 4th April, 2007

    […]The second Digital Campus podcast has a follow-up on the previous Wikipedia discussion I mentioned, with some commentary on a few of these stories; apparently, reporters are practically knocking these professors’ doors down requesting Wikipedia-related expert opinions[…]

  3. Stephen Francoeur : 31st January, 2008

    Have any of the hosts of the show looked into doing what Northwestern University did with its copy of the Video Encyclopedia of the Twentieth Century? Here at Baruch, we’re exploring whether we can replicate what Northwestern did, which is essentially load all the videos into a server so the content can be streamed by students and faculty as individual clips. Details at http://archive.nmc.org/gallery/fmof1999/fmof_1999_1a.shtml

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