Archive forApril, 2007

Episode 04 – Welcome to the Social

17 April, 20073 comments

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Can social networking sites like Facebook play a productive role in the humanities? In this episode Dan plays the old fogey, while Tom and Mills talk about how to use these sites in an advantageous way. We also report on recent meetings on the digital humanities and digital museums, and discuss Google’s My Maps and Creative Common’s Learn initiative. And Mills and Dan plot an intervention to get Tom off of Twitter.

Also discussed were iGTD, Scenemaker, and the new digital humanities PBWiki.

Featuring: Dan Cohen, Mills Kelly, Tom Scheinfeldt.

Running time: 47:57.

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[Editor’s note: This podcast was recorded before the terrible tragedy at Virginia Tech–thus our normal, jovial tone and failure to mention that horrible day. Our hearts go out to the entire Virginia Tech community, some of whom are now or have been our colleagues at the Center for History and New Media.]

Categorized under copyright, Facebook, Google, social networking, Twitter

Episode 03 – CI: Cyberinfrastructure

4 April, 20072 comments

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Our third podcast begins with some discussion of April Fools’ pranks, including a great one about Google acquiring the OCLC, and how blogs and the internet can foster hoaxes. This week’s feature takes a look at the hot topic of cyberinfrastructure. We also take a look at Turnitin, and the larger issue of plagiarism. Links for the week include Librivox, Swivel, and the Center’s own research tool Zotero.

Featuring: Dan Cohen, Mills Kelly, Tom Scheinfeldt

Running time: 55:16

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Categorized under Google

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