Episode 03 – CI: Cyberinfrastructure

4 April, 20072 comments

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Our third podcast begins with some discussion of April Fools’ pranks, including a great one about Google acquiring the OCLC, and how blogs and the internet can foster hoaxes. This week’s feature takes a look at the hot topic of cyberinfrastructure. We also take a look at Turnitin, and the larger issue of plagiarism. Links for the week include Librivox, Swivel, and the Center’s own research tool Zotero.

Featuring: Dan Cohen, Mills Kelly, Tom Scheinfeldt

Running time: 55:16

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Categorized under Google

2 comments to “Episode 03 – CI: Cyberinfrastructure”

  1. Chris Grisanti : 5th April, 2007

    Digital Campus,

    Thanks for spotlighting Swivel on your April 4th podcast. We appreciate Mills’ data geekiness and hope that all of you will come play around on Swivel.

    Just to clarify one of the points made by Mills (51:10), Swivel currently allows for comparing two different data sets, although the feature isn’t as clearly called out as it should be. To access this feature, click on the Compare button below any graph (apple & oranges picture) and you can access the comparison interface.

    Here are a couple of examples for interested listeners:

    Iraq Civilian vs. Coalition Deaths:
    http://swivel.com/graphs/show/8682955

    US GDP vs. Yearly Avg. Global Temperature
    http://swivel.com/graphs/show/1016984

    Wine Consumption vs. Violent Crime:
    http://swivel.com/graphs/show/1001967

    Thanks again for spotlighting us!

    Regards,

    Chris Grisanti
    Swiveler
    moc.l1513291178eviws1513291178@sirh1513291178c1513291178

  2. Is Turnitin.com violating the copyrights of students? « LACUNY Blog : 3rd March, 2008

    […] Humanities podcast (4/4/07) online […]

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