Episode 16 – Steal This E-Book

4 December, 20072 comments

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Amazon.com‘s release of its new e-book reader the Kindle has set off a frenzy of speculation about the future of books, reading, and publishing. The Digital Campus team debates the promise and problems of the Kindle and e-book readers in general. In the news roundup we express outrage at a possible new U.S. bill that would remove funds from universities that fail to stop online piracy and at Facebook‘s new feature that allows everyone to see what you’re buying. A cranky holiday-season podcast for listeners new and old!

Other links mentioned on the podcast:
Marvel Comics Archive
Vixy
phillyhistory.org
OpenCast

Running time: 44:02
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Categorized under ebooks

2 comments to “Episode 16 – Steal This E-Book”

  1. books » Blog Archive » Episode 16 - Steal This E-Book : 4th December, 2007

    […] Comments from Left Field wrote an interesting post today onHere’s a quick excerpt Amazon.com’s release of its new e-book reader the Kindle has set off a frenzy of speculation about the future of books, reading, and publishing. The Digital Campus team debates the promise and problems of the Kindle and e-book readers in general. In the news roundup we express outrage at a possible new U.S. bill that would remove funds from universities that fail to stop online piracy and at Facebook’s new feature that allows everyone to see what you’re buying. A cranky holiday-season podcast f […]

  2. Danny O. Snow : 26th January, 2008

    Is there any NEW news here? As the author of “Steal this e-Book!” (2002) and a variety of articles about e-publishing for publishing trade journals over the years, I see the Kindle as just the latest attempt in a long series of efforts to get the public to pay high prices for e-books and devices for reading them.

    The truth is that authors and publishers, not readers, must adapt to new ways of delivering reading material. As we have already seen quite clearly in the music industry, consumers won’t pay inflated prices for music or players.

    After years of whining, major record labels are finally offering legal downloads for 99 cents. When will authors and publishers see that the same is true for books?

    — Danny O. Snow, Senior Fellow, Society for New Communications Research

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