Episode 30 – Live From Egypt!

21 July, 20082 comments

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On this episode we were lucky to have a live link to Alexandria, Egypt, for Wikimania 2008, the international meeting of those who work on Wikipedia and related open collaborative projects. In the feature segment we talk with Liam Wyatt of Wikipedia Weekly, who gives an insider’s scoop of the issues, debates, and future of Wikipedia. In the news roundup we discuss Yahoo’s new open search service, BOSS, and Google’s new virtual world, Lively, among other things. Picks of the week include some advice from Google’s blogs, some rich web-based applications, and Gmail power user tweaks.

Links mentioned on the podcast:
Wikimania 2008
Wikipedia Weekly
Yahoo BOSS
Google Lively
Aviary
Google Labs Gmail tweaks
Requesting reconsideration using Google Webmaster Tools
Technologies Behind Google Ranking

Running time: 48:03
Download the .mp3

Categorized under Google, Wikipedia, Yahoo!

2 comments to “Episode 30 – Live From Egypt!”

  1. Derek Bruff : 29th July, 2008

    Thanks for another great episode. I liked the “live” reporting from Egypt! Given Liam Wyatt’s interest in parallels between historical arguments and processes in academia and on Wikipedia, I thought he (and listeners) might be interested in hearing an interview with a history professor, Michael Bess, here at Vanderbilt who used Wikipedia to help his undergraduate history majors learn to think and reason like historians.

    Bess had his students learn about the atomic bombings at the end of World War II and then had his students examine the discussion behind the Wikipedia page on that same topic. He found that just about every aspect of the nature of historical thought and reasoning was evidenced in that discussion page, making this a useful activity for history majors.

  2. Elizabeth Scheibel : 30th July, 2008

    On several shows, you have mentioned that you wish you had the perspective of a younger person, a digital native, to compare and contrast with you own. Why not have one as a regular or semi-regular part of the show? A 25 year old, female, graduate student in library and information science with an English major and history and classics minors might be fun…

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