Episode 35 – Top Ten of 2008

19 December, 20083 comments

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Dan, Mills, and Tom round out 2008 with the top ten most significant stories, trends, and technologies of the year. The regulars discuss how netbooks, Google Books, e-books, and iPhones made 2008 a year to remember. What will make the list in 2009? The regulars offer some predictions as well.

Running time: 51:30
Download the .mp3

Categorized under year in review

3 comments to “Episode 35 – Top Ten of 2008”

  1. Richard : 30th December, 2008

    Tom,

    What are the reasons that you think 2009 will be the year that museums “catch up?” It seems that with the current economic problems that they’ll still have problems even maintaining where they are at – and even with these challenges I don’t expect that other sectors will be standing still.

    “Museums” are also far from monolithic. Well-funded art and science museums have always been at a different point on the technology adoption curve than their history-oriented siblings. Sometimes I wish that it wasn’t a matter of catching-up, but a better understanding of how to leapfrog ahead using the lessons learned by early adopters. We don’t want to be “catching-up” just as everyone else is leaving the party.

    Thanks for a great series of podcasts, keep up the great work!

  2. Bryan Alexander : 6th January, 2009

    Another fine podcast. I’m still working through it, but wanted to mention a couple of things.

    Wikipedia: I still hear complaints and worries about it from faculty and librarians.

    Ebooks: am exploring the Kindle now, and agree that this has some serious academic resonance.

    Camp-style conferences: agreeing on their benefits, we’re holding a NITLE camp this summer.

    More as I continue through the mp3.

  3. Pete Jones : 16th January, 2009

    Solid Top Ten-

    I respond and agree with it here.

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