Episode 54 – Birds in the Background

8 April, 20101 comment

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Mills, Tom, and Dan welcome Lisa Spiro back to the podcast to talk about the much ballyhooed launch of Apple’s iPad, the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals decision against “net neutrality,” and—to the sounds of spring’s first robin song twittering through Mills’ open window—the role of the Twitter backchannel at the University of Virginia’s recent Shape of Things to Come conference. Other stories include the National Endowment for the Humanities announcement of 18 Digital Humanities Start-up Grants and Yale’s decision to delay its switch to Gmail.

Links mentioned on the podcast:

David Pogue’s New York Times review of the iPad
In Our Time, “The City”
New NEH Digital Start Up Grants at edwired.org
JISC crowdsourcing projects
Integrating Digital Papyrology Project
Civil War Washington

Running time: 1:06:50
Download the .mp3

Categorized under digital humanities, email, Google, iPad, net neutrality, sustainability, Twitter

1 comment to “Episode 54 – Birds in the Background”

  1. Anne Peoples : 14th April, 2010

    Following on from the discussion on community engagement and crowd sourcing, you might be interested in this Scottish initiative (if you don’t know about it already), the Intangible Cultural Heritage in Scotland Wiki at http://ichscotland.org/. This is funded by the AHRC and is based at the Scottish Centre for the Book at Edinburgh Napier University. I learned about it at a Web 2.0 in Libraries and Museums session I contributed to at SCOB in January.

    I was really pleased to hear the plug for In Our Time which is the best example of what the BBC does best (along with A History of the World in 100 Objects, now also available as a podcast). The IOT archive now goes back to 2004 and covers an amazing range of topics.

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