Episode 77 – #FERPANUTS

21 November, 20116 comments

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In an age of course wikis and blogs, is a law written in 1974 up to the task of controlling where student information might go? Why does Google want us to register on their new citation service? And can the recorded lectures of Mills Kelly be remixed to make him look foolish (or is it already too late for that)? Find out on this episode of everyone’s favorite podcast featuring a trio of people named Tom, Mills, and Dan.

Links mentioned on the podcast:
Georgia Tech Invokes FERPA, Cripples School’s Wikis
University of Missouri to limit lecture recording
Google Scholar Citations Open to All
JSTOR’s Data for Research

Running time: 39:02
Download the .mp3

Categorized under cloud computing, law, podcasting, privacy, wikis

6 comments to “Episode 77 – #FERPANUTS”

  1. Overreacting to FERPA Concerns : 22nd November, 2011

    [...] The good folks at Digital Campus have some thoughts on the recent decisions at Georgia Tech and the University of Missouri in their latest installment. [...]

  2. Benoît Melançon : 23rd November, 2011

    Two words about Google Scholar Citations.

    I agree with you that citation indexes don’t make much sense in the humanities, but I think Google Scholar Citations allows for two interesting things.

    It allows researchers to correct false attributions. For example, I have authored a few books in literary studies, but not the one Google Scholar Citations—and Amazon.com—thinks I authored about making three-d animation movies.

    It also allows researchers to correct weird bibliographical references. Almost every citation I was attributed by Google Scholar Citations suffered from some kind of inaccuracies.

    For the time being I have decided to make my page public; http://scholar.google.com/citations?user=thobws0AAAAJ&hl=en. I don’t know for how long, though.

  3. John S. Erickson, Ph.D. : 24th November, 2011

    Thanks very much for this edition of Digital Campus! Our lab has been “strongly encouraging” blogging of work by our undergrad researchers, helping them to gain first-hand experience with social media tools and especially how social media can be used to share work in an agile way with colleagues. We don’t provide the platform; we direct them to one of the free cloud services (wordpress.com, blogspot.com, etc) or to chose their own.

    As I listened to your discussion, I wondered whether that makes a difference: students blogging (and indeed tweeting and youtubing) independent of the university infrastructure.

    I agree with you that this conversation has only just begun…

  4. Protecting Student Privacy Without Going FERPANUTS - ProfHacker - The Chronicle of Higher Education : 30th November, 2011

    [...] Back in November, Georgia Tech took down their wikis, claiming that they constituted a FERPA violation. This stirred up quite a discussion on Twitter, as well as on blogs and podcasts (see, for instance this and this). [...]

  5. My latest at ProfHacker: Protecting Student Privacy Without Going FERPANUTS : 30th November, 2011

    [...] Back in November, Georgia Tech took down their wikis, claiming that they constituted a FERPA violation. This stirred up quite a discussion on Twitter, as well as on blogs and podcasts (see, for instance this and this). [...]

  6. Digital Pedagogy Roundup – First Half of 2012 » Roger T. Whitson, Ph.D : 25th June, 2012

    [...] Campus Podcasts Digital Campus Episode 77: #FERPANUTS Digital Campus Episode 86: “Ya Big MOOC” Audrey Watters and Steve Haragdon’s [...]

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