Archive forMarch, 2014

Episode #104 – Social Science History 2: Electric Boogaloo

26 March, 2014No comments

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In this episode, Amanda, Stephen, Mills, and guest Joan Troyano were joined by Digital History Fellows Spencer Roberts and Anne Ladyem McDivitt. The first topic of discussion was the announcement of the American Historical Association’s $1.6 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, through which four history departments will restructure their doctoral programs to promote diverse career options for history PhDs. The conversation then moved to the lawsuit between Duke University Press and the Social Science History Association regarding ownership of the Social Science History journal. Finally, on a completely different note, we discussed wearable computing and the implications for digital humanities, which raised lots of questions, excitement, and confusion amongst the participants.

To conclude the episode, Joan provided an update from the PressForward project at CHNM, including the upcoming release of their new WordPress plugin.

Related Links:

History PhD being Redesigned?

http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2014/03/20/historians-association-and-four-doctoral-programs-start-new-effort-broaden-phd

http://www.historians.org/teaching-and-learning/current-projects/career-diversity-for-historians/the-many-careers-of-history-phds

http://blog.historians.org/2014/03/aha-receives-grant-expand-career-tracks-history-phds/

Duke UP and Social Science History association lawsuit over ownership of journal

http://chronicle.com.mutex.gmu.edu/article/Dispute-Over-Who-Will-Publish/145307/

http://blogs.library.duke.edu/scholcomm/2014/03/18/more-than-meets-the-eye/

http://publichistorycommons.org/update-on-the-journal/

Advances in Wearable Computing

Google Smart Watch
http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/03/18/google-introduces-a-smart-watch/?_php=true&_type=blogs&partner=rss&emc=rss&_r=0

Recently published book, Pastplay: Teaching and Learning History with Technologyhttp://www.press.umich.edu/6025015/pastplay

Bill Turkel’s Humanities Fabrication and Physical Computing: http://williamjturkel.net/

Thingiverse: http://thingiverse.com

Report from the Center

http://pressforward.org/the-pressforward-plugin/

Running time: 52:28
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Categorized under Android, copyright, Google, intellectual property, journals, law, publishing

Episode 103 – Big Data to Big Business

7 March, 20144 comments

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In this episode the usual suspects, Mills, Stephen, Amanda, Dan and Tom gathered for yet another lively discussion. The episode began with a discussion on the trend toward opening data as several big players, the Getty, Twitter, Microsoft and the Public Library of Science took steps toward greater accessibility of their resources. The hosts also highlighted the subject of virtual conference attendance, looking at the “dopplebot” conference attendance model. From big changes to a historical look back, the group switched gears to discuss a Pew Report that looks back at 25 years of internet use, broad discussion of changes and how the internet has become an indispensable facet of our lives. Nothing demonstrates that more than the next topic of discussion, the $19 billion dollar purchase of WhatsApp.

They were joined by Sharon Leon, director of Public Projects at CHNM for an announcement about two upcoming summer institutes at CHNM for Art Historians and American Historians.

Related Links:

Opening access to data

Virtual Conference attendance:

PewReport – http://www.pewinternet.org/2014/02/27/summary-of-findings-3

WhatsApp acquisition for $19 billion

Sharon updates on Art Historians & American Historians institutes

Running time: 41:08
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Categorized under conferences, data, Facebook, Library of Congress, museums, open access, Twitter

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