Archive forApple

Episode #117 — What Can You Do With iPads & Smartphones?

19 November, 2015No comments

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Dan’s visit to the Apple Store prompts a discussion of the new iPad Pro, and just what you can and can’t do on Apple’s tablet. Are we all just too old to give up our laptops for tablets? The New York Times and Google recently teamed up to deliver another way to use your smartphone – for virtual reality, via Google Cardboard. Is this the beginning of an expansion of VR? Or is it just the View-Master of Mills’ and Stephen’s youth reborn? Finally, we discussed the recent study of media use by tweens and teens by Common Sense Media that highlighted the digital disparities facing low-income teens. In particular, although most have smartphones, they lack access to laptops or desktops on which to do the increasing amount of online homework teachers are assigning. Stephen and Dan talked about the key role of public libraries in giving teenagers access to computers and wireless Internet.

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Running time: 47:50

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Categorized under Apple, hardware, iPad, mobile

Episode #113–You Can’t Trust Everything on the Web

13 April, 2015No comments

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On this episode of Digital Campus, host Mills Kelly, along with Dan Cohen, Amanda French, and Stephen Robertson discuss the role of technology in the classroom and some of history’s most teachable moments courtesy of the US Postal Service.

To begin, everyone weighs in on the Maya Angelou stamp controversy and whether or not quotation inaccuracies are getting worse because of the internet.  Then the crew discusses a recent survey by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation which found that only 20% of college and university professors have used “high-tech teaching methods.”  Dan argues that the majority of professors default to textbook teaching just to get the job done. While professors lack digital diversity, the group then shifts to discussing whether the Apple watch could cause problems in the classroom. Could widespread adoption of wearable technology lead to easier cheating? The podcast wrapped up by congratulating Amanda on being elected to the THAT Camp counsel for another year and the announcement that THAT Camp has switched to Reclaim Hosting.

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Running time: 41:28

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Categorized under Apple, Apple Watch, teaching, THATCamp, wearable technology

Episode #112 – Digital Campus Classic

23 March, 20151 comment

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Along with Dan Cohen and Tom Scheinfeldt, Mills Kelly hosted this classic episode of Digital Campus devoted entirely to technology. Mills, Dan, and Tom discussed the demise of Internet Explorer and IE’s replacement, Spartan, which is meant to complement and facilitate Microsoft’s new operating system. Then the discussion moved to the Apple watch and how such a technology might be adapted for higher education. In continuing with the Apple theme, Mills, Dan, and Tom then talked about the new MacBook that is going to have only one port. Mills reminded the listeners that Steve Jobs is in fact dead, and that creating a laptop with USB drives is an acceptable enterprise. The podcast wrapped up after Mills brought up the Maker Movements. Digital History Fellows Anne Ladyem McDivitt and Alyssa Toby Fahringer produced this podcast.

Links:

Internet Explorer

Tom Warren, “Microsoft is Killing Off the Internet Explorer Brand,” The Verge, March 17, 2015. 

Apple

Casey Fabris, “What Might an Apple Watch for Higher Education Look Like?” The Chronicle of Higher Education, March 10, 2015. 

Tim Moynihan, “Life with the MacBook’s Single Port Won’t Be Easy – Yet,” Wired, March 16, 2015.

Apple ResearchKit

Chris Mills, “Will.I.Am Finally Found a Customer for his Smartwatch: Gucci,” Gizmodo, March 19, 2015. 

“Apple Introduces Revolutionary New Laptop With No Keyboard,” The Onion.

Maker Faires

NoVa Mini Maker Faire

Maker Faires Around the World

 

Running time: 39:42

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Categorized under Apple, Microsoft

Episode #100 — The Best and Worst of 2007

8 November, 2013No comments

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For our hundredth anniversary episode, the digital history fellows divided up the 2007 episodes of Digital Campus and picked their favorite bits — listen to the result if you dare, and be transported back to the days when the iPhone was brand new, when Second Life was the Next Big Thing, and when you had to have an email address with a .edu TLD in order to use Facebook. Good times.

Many thanks to digital history fellows Ben Hurwitz, Jannelle Legg, Anne McDivitt, Amanda Morgan, Amanda Regan, and Spencer Roberts for choosing the clips, and many many thanks to audiovisual guru Chris Preperato for stitching them together.

 

Running time: 58:13
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Categorized under Amazon, Android, Apple, archives, awards, Blackboard, blogs, books, browsers, BuddyPress, cloud computing, conferences, copyright, course management systems, digital humanities, DPLA, ebooks, Elsevier, email, Facebook, Flickr, freedom of speech, funding, Google, gossip, hardware, intellectual property, iPad, iPhone, journals, JSTOR, law, libraries, Library of Congress, linked open data, Linux, maps, Microsoft, mobile, MOOCs, Mozilla, museums, NEH, net neutrality, netbooks, Omeka, open access, open source, Pinterest, podcasting, privacy, programming, public domain, publishing, reading, search, social networking, sustainability, teaching, tenure and promotion, Tumblr, Twitter, unconferences, video, virtual worlds, web 2.0, web applications, Wikipedia, wikis, WordPress, Yahoo!, year in review, YouTube

Episode 91 — The Black Helicopter Edition

15 October, 2012No comments

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While President Obama spoke on the other side of campus and the security helicopters buzzed the Digital Campus studio, Tom, Dan, and Mills (Amanda was at a secure and undisclosed location–so undisclosed we couldn’t get her on the show) discussed Dan’s iPhone fetish–yes, he has an iPhone 5–and what the constantly changing landscape of new devices like the iPhone 5 might mean for the humanities. We also breathed a huge sigh of relief that one part of the never ending litigation over Google’s book scanning project has come to an end. If only it were the last chapter in that saga! Is it news that Facebook now has more than 1 billion users? Or that they are using your tagging of family and friends to improve their facial recognition algorithms? Give the podcast a listen to find out what we thought about these topics and more.

Links mentioned in the podcast:

Google’s book settlement website
Google buying Viewdle
A newly discovered photograph of Emily Dickinson
Facebook tops 1 billion
A humorous analysis of the Facebook Billion

 

Running time: 44:54
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Categorized under Apple, copyright, Facebook, Google, iPhone

Episode 87 – You Guys Sound Fantastic

6 June, 2012No comments

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Our friend Steve Ramsay rejoins the regulars to pore over the Facebook IPO and its fallout for the markets and the gossip pages. Reluctantly, we turn to more familiar turf with updates on the Google Books and George State e-reserves cases. We then take a moment to lament the closure of the University of Missouri press before ending the show with a discussion of the push toward minimalism and readability in digital humanities web design.

Links mentioned on the podcast:
Facebook (NASDAQ:FB)
Judge Certifies Authors as Class in Google Book-Scanning Lawsuit
GBS: Authors Guild Goes for an Early Knockout
Publishers and Georgia State See Broad Implications in Copyright Ruling
University of Missouri Press to close, after 54 years
Jeffrey Zeldman’s Web Design Manifesto 2012

Running time: 38:03
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Categorized under Apple, blogs, copyright, digital humanities, Facebook, Google, gossip, journals, law, libraries, publishing, reading, social networking

Episode 85 — Book ’em, Bezos

1 May, 2012No comments

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In this edition of the podcast, Dan, Amanda, Tom, and Mills are joined by Tim Carmody, senior writer for Wired, and it was very refreshing to record what we called a “fact-based” podcast for a change. At the top of the show, we got Tim’s take on the lawsuit filed by the Department of Justice against Apple and several of the major book publishers. Sharp-eared listeners will remember that we discussed this topic in the previous podcast–when it had first arisen. This time around, we were able to take advantage of Tim’s deep knowledge of this complex topic. In particular, we discussed why the average ebook consumer should care and whether the end result would be Amazon.com taking over the world. In addition, we discussed rental fees being recommended to Canadian universities for the use of digital journals, and whether Google Drive (yes, we said “Google” this time) would become part of our lives, or would it end up in the dustbin of history along with Google Wave and other such fails by the search giant.

Links:

DOJ Announces Terms of Settlement With 3 Publishers in E-Book Lawsuit
The most expensive copyright insurance policy in Canadian history
Introducing Google Drive…yes, really
Google Drive: A step closer to no-fuss cloud storage?

Running time: 1:12:35
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Categorized under Amazon, Apple, cloud computing, ebooks, open access, publishing

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