Archive forcloud computing

Episode #100 — The Best and Worst of 2007

8 November, 2013No comments

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For our hundredth anniversary episode, the digital history fellows divided up the 2007 episodes of Digital Campus and picked their favorite bits — listen to the result if you dare, and be transported back to the days when the iPhone was brand new, when Second Life was the Next Big Thing, and when you had to have an email address with a .edu TLD in order to use Facebook. Good times.

Many thanks to digital history fellows Ben Hurwitz, Jannelle Legg, Anne McDivitt, Amanda Morgan, Amanda Regan, and Spencer Roberts for choosing the clips, and many many thanks to audiovisual guru Chris Preperato for stitching them together.

 

Running time: 58:13
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Categorized under Amazon, Android, Apple, archives, awards, Blackboard, blogs, books, browsers, BuddyPress, cloud computing, conferences, copyright, course management systems, digital humanities, DPLA, ebooks, Elsevier, email, Facebook, Flickr, freedom of speech, funding, Google, gossip, hardware, intellectual property, iPad, iPhone, journals, JSTOR, law, libraries, Library of Congress, linked open data, Linux, maps, Microsoft, mobile, MOOCs, Mozilla, museums, NEH, net neutrality, netbooks, Omeka, open access, open source, Pinterest, podcasting, privacy, programming, public domain, publishing, reading, search, social networking, sustainability, teaching, tenure and promotion, Tumblr, Twitter, unconferences, video, virtual worlds, web 2.0, web applications, Wikipedia, wikis, WordPress, Yahoo!, year in review, YouTube

Episode 85 — Book ’em, Bezos

1 May, 2012No comments

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In this edition of the podcast, Dan, Amanda, Tom, and Mills are joined by Tim Carmody, senior writer for Wired, and it was very refreshing to record what we called a “fact-based” podcast for a change. At the top of the show, we got Tim’s take on the lawsuit filed by the Department of Justice against Apple and several of the major book publishers. Sharp-eared listeners will remember that we discussed this topic in the previous podcast–when it had first arisen. This time around, we were able to take advantage of Tim’s deep knowledge of this complex topic. In particular, we discussed why the average ebook consumer should care and whether the end result would be Amazon.com taking over the world. In addition, we discussed rental fees being recommended to Canadian universities for the use of digital journals, and whether Google Drive (yes, we said “Google” this time) would become part of our lives, or would it end up in the dustbin of history along with Google Wave and other such fails by the search giant.

Links:

DOJ Announces Terms of Settlement With 3 Publishers in E-Book Lawsuit
The most expensive copyright insurance policy in Canadian history
Introducing Google Drive…yes, really
Google Drive: A step closer to no-fuss cloud storage?

Running time: 1:12:35
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Categorized under Amazon, Apple, cloud computing, ebooks, open access, publishing

Episode 82 – Haranguer for Hire

28 February, 2012No comments

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We report on a new CLIR / NITLE project to develop a technical infrastructure for publishing new-model digital scholarship, what’s coming in the next version of Mac OS X and other operating systems and what their cloud centrism might mean for universities and their privacy concerns, and canvas the current (and historic) situation with regard to open access. All best wishes for speedy recovery of your voice, Mills.

Editor’s Note 2/27/2012: Soon after we recorded the podcast on 2/24/2012, Elsevier withdrew its support for the Research Works Act, and news subsequently spread that indeed the entire Act would not go forward. See http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/intro.cws_home/newmessagerwa and https://plus.google.com/u/0/107980702132412632948/posts/a4DzVk9n7fG.

Links to stories mentioned on the podcast:

Running time: 59:10
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Categorized under Apple, cloud computing, copyright, Elsevier, Google, intellectual property, Mozilla, open access, privacy, publishing

Episode 77 – #FERPANUTS

21 November, 20116 comments

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In an age of course wikis and blogs, is a law written in 1974 up to the task of controlling where student information might go? Why does Google want us to register on their new citation service? And can the recorded lectures of Mills Kelly be remixed to make him look foolish (or is it already too late for that)? Find out on this episode of everyone’s favorite podcast featuring a trio of people named Tom, Mills, and Dan.

Links mentioned on the podcast:
Georgia Tech Invokes FERPA, Cripples School’s Wikis
University of Missouri to limit lecture recording
Google Scholar Citations Open to All
JSTOR’s Data for Research

Running time: 39:02
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Categorized under cloud computing, law, podcasting, privacy, wikis

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