Archive forjournals

Episode 78 – Death Knell for the Paywall

2 December, 20111 comment

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

The clock strikes noon, and that sound might just signal the end of the bright morning for closed systems in higher education. On this week’s podcast, we discuss Coursekit, a free (for now) learning management system built by dropouts from the University of Pennsylvania; Commons-in-a-Box, a free (funded by the Sloan Foundation) academic social networking system of blogs and wikis that will be built by non-dropouts from the CUNY Academic Commons; and the Berlin 9 Open Access Conference, which seems to have convinced not only several universities but also the White House that peer-reviewed scholarly publications should be, what else, free. Our honored guest is journalist Audrey Watters of Hack Education.

Links

What Does Coursekit Say About the Future of the LMS?
“Commons in a Box” and the Importance of Open Academic Networks
Beyond the Iron Triangle: Containing the Cost of College and Student Debt
Berlin 9 Open Access Conference
Open Access Policy Adopted at Princeton
Open Access to Knowledge at Wesleyan
Request for Information on Public Access to Digital Data and Scientific Publications (submit your comments by January 2, 2012)
HASTAC Annual Meeting 2011

Running time: 50:35
Download the .mp3

Categorized under Blackboard, blogs, conferences, course management systems, intellectual property, journals, open access, publishing, social networking, teaching, wikis

Episode 76 – Siri? How Do I Fix Academic Publishing?

8 November, 20111 comment

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Is it just us, or does it seem kind of strange to see people walking around campus, the mall, or the local park talking to their phones as if those phones were actually sentient? Even if it is a little strange, Dan, Tom, Amanda, and Mills spent some time speculating about what such “talk to me” apps might mean for museums, historic sites, and other places digital humanists care about. We also had generally nice things to say about the developer build of Windows 8 and about the recent meeting about the Digital Public Library of America. Our discussion of free content then led to a conversation about how much money is being made publishing academic journals by just a few publishing houses and why open access scholarship is so necessary to the circulation of knowledge. Our outrage about journal publishing profits burned itself out when we turned to a brief look at the newly launched (and free) Digital Humanities Now, a CHNM project. We finished with perhaps the world’s shortest conversation about Google+. Why? Give a listen and find out.

Links mentioned in the podcast:

In Public It’s Rude, In Private It’s Creepy
Why Indoor Navigation is so Hard
Building Windows 8
Download Windows 8 Developer Preview
DPLA: First Things First
Copyright Office on Mass Digitization
Economics of Open Access Publishing

 

Running time: 58:45
Download the .mp3

Categorized under Apple, digital humanities, Google, iPhone, journals, libraries, Microsoft, mobile, museums, open access

Episode 72 – May the Swartz Be With You

3 August, 20111 comment

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Lisa Spiro and Jeff McClurken join Amanda, Mills, and Tom for a high summer episode of Digital Campus. (Dan Cohen did not join us this time, choosing instead to remain incommunicado in an undisclosed location while he writes some book or something.) There is no avoiding the story of Aaron Swartz, the 24-year-old Harvard researcher arrested for hacking MIT’s JSTOR subscription, which raised for our panel, among other concerns, ongoing questions about open access and the viability for libraries of “big deal,” multiple-journal subscription packages. We also mourn (or celebrate) the demise of the big box bookseller Borders, share thoughts about the next generation of operating systems (including Mac OS 10.7 “Lion” and Windows 8), and hold our collective breath as we await major cuts to humanities funding from Congress.

UPDATE 8/17: There was a stretch of dead air in the recording we first posted that we’ve gotten rid of. The corrected recording is below; in a podcast manager such as iTunes you can delete the old recording and refresh your feed to get the new, corrected one. You might need to unsubscribe and resubscribe to the feed. Also, check out this terrific article on the Swartz affair by Maria Bustillos over at The Awl.

Running time: 56:58
Download the .mp3

Categorized under Apple, books, copyright, ebooks, funding, intellectual property, journals, libraries, Microsoft, open access

Episode 57 – Fight Club Soap

10 June, 20103 comments

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Returning from a post-THATCamp hiatus, podcast regulars Dan, Mills, and Tom are joined by original irregulars Amanda French and Jeff McClurken to discuss the new iPhone, a nascent course management offering from Google, and the launch of Microsoft Office Web Apps. The panel applauds the University of California/California Digital Library in its showdown with Nature Publishing Group over subscription costs and weighs in on students buying and selling course spots on Craigslist. Hat tip to our good friend Bethany Nowviskie for this episode’s inspired title.

Links mentioned on the podcast:
ProfHacker
Letter from UC to faculty [.pdf]
Nature Publishing Group responds, via Ars Technica

Running time: 57:41
Download the .mp3

Categorized under Apple, course management systems, Google, iPhone, journals, libraries, Microsoft, publishing

Episode 43 – Summer Wrap-up

14 September, 20097 comments

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

The Digital Campus team is delighted to be back after a summer hiatus with a new podcast covering the many important developments from the past few months related to academia, libraries, museums, and technology. We cover and make pointed (and occasionally wisecracking) commentary upon the status of the Google Books settlement, ebook readers, and cameras on student devices, among other topics. We also cover shiny new things like Google Wave, RSSCloud, and PubSubHubbub. Picks include a new blog, an article on the future of journals, and how to take command of the command line. We’re looking forward to another year of the podcast, and hope you are too!

Other links mentioned on the podcast:
Sugar on a Stick
ProfHacker.com
Learning Unix
Is There a Future for Journals in the Humanities?
Cool-er ebook reader

Running time: 50:21
Download the .mp3

Categorized under books, Google, journals, Linux

Episode 42 – The Real World

21 May, 20093 comments

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Dan and Mills welcome Tom back from paternity leave with a whirlwind roundup of the last month’s news. The regulars try to keep it real, exposing a scandal in scientific journal publishing, assessing the buzz surrounding the launch of a new computational search engine, questioning recent applications of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, and delving once again into the Google Books settlement and some late breaking developments at the University of Michigan Library.

Other links mentioned on the podcast:

Cohen and Rosenzweig, Web of Lies? Historical Knowledge on the Internet
U.S. Copyright Office triennial DMCA exemption review
California’s open source digital textbook initiative
Microsoft Funds Opposition to Google Books settlement
Brewster Kahle on the Google Books settlement
The University of Michigan and Google Amended Digitization Agreement
Virtual Box
Zotero 2.0 drops

Running time: 51:52
Download the .mp3

Categorized under copyright, Google, journals, libraries, publishing, search

Subscribe to Digital Campus Follow us on Twitter

Hosts

One could spend hours listening to these witty, modern podcasts.

American Historical Association Today

Credits

Categories

Archives

Courtesy of