Archive fornet neutrality

Episode #100 — The Best and Worst of 2007

8 November, 2013No comments

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For our hundredth anniversary episode, the digital history fellows divided up the 2007 episodes of Digital Campus and picked their favorite bits — listen to the result if you dare, and be transported back to the days when the iPhone was brand new, when Second Life was the Next Big Thing, and when you had to have an email address with a .edu TLD in order to use Facebook. Good times.

Many thanks to digital history fellows Ben Hurwitz, Jannelle Legg, Anne McDivitt, Amanda Morgan, Amanda Regan, and Spencer Roberts for choosing the clips, and many many thanks to audiovisual guru Chris Preperato for stitching them together.

 

Running time: 58:13
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Categorized under Amazon, Android, Apple, archives, awards, Blackboard, blogs, books, browsers, BuddyPress, cloud computing, conferences, copyright, course management systems, digital humanities, DPLA, ebooks, Elsevier, email, Facebook, Flickr, freedom of speech, funding, Google, gossip, hardware, intellectual property, iPad, iPhone, journals, JSTOR, law, libraries, Library of Congress, linked open data, Linux, maps, Microsoft, mobile, MOOCs, Mozilla, museums, NEH, net neutrality, netbooks, Omeka, open access, open source, Pinterest, podcasting, privacy, programming, public domain, publishing, reading, search, social networking, sustainability, teaching, tenure and promotion, Tumblr, Twitter, unconferences, video, virtual worlds, web 2.0, web applications, Wikipedia, wikis, WordPress, Yahoo!, year in review, YouTube

Episode 54 – Birds in the Background

8 April, 20101 comment

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Mills, Tom, and Dan welcome Lisa Spiro back to the podcast to talk about the much ballyhooed launch of Apple’s iPad, the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals decision against “net neutrality,” and—to the sounds of spring’s first robin song twittering through Mills’ open window—the role of the Twitter backchannel at the University of Virginia’s recent Shape of Things to Come conference. Other stories include the National Endowment for the Humanities announcement of 18 Digital Humanities Start-up Grants and Yale’s decision to delay its switch to Gmail.

Links mentioned on the podcast:

David Pogue’s New York Times review of the iPad
In Our Time, “The City”
New NEH Digital Start Up Grants at edwired.org
JISC crowdsourcing projects
Integrating Digital Papyrology Project
Civil War Washington

Running time: 1:06:50
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Categorized under digital humanities, email, Google, iPad, net neutrality, sustainability, Twitter

Episode 45 – Wave Hello

13 October, 20092 comments

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While Dan is distracted and rendered unintelligent by his first experience with Google Wave, Mills, Tom, and newcomer Lisa Spiro manage to have a cogent discussion of whether Wave will have any (positive) impact on education, update the ongoing Google Books saga, examine Chrome within Internet Explorer, highlight the Kindle underperforming on campus, debate the FTC’s ruling on bloggers accepting gifts (including university presses giving free books to bloggers), and look at advance of net neutrality. Picks of the podcast include a wiki for seeing into the future, an assessment of collegiate internet use, tools for Twitter and RSS, and a time-waster of a blog.

Links mentioned on the podcast:
Horizon Report wiki
Everyday life, online: U.S. college students’ use of the Internet
Twitter Feed
RSS Digest (WordPress Plugin)
Futility Closet blog

Running time: 43:45
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Categorized under books, Google, Microsoft, net neutrality, publishing

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