Archive foropen access

Episode #118 – Predicting the Past – 2015 Year in Review

19 December, 2015No comments

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In the 2015 installment of the Digital Campus Year in Review podcast, regulars Dan Cohen, Amanda French, Tom Scheinfeldt, and Stephen Robertson look back at 2015 and predict the big news of 2016. Cheers went out to the NEH/Mellon Humanities Open Book Program, Congress (c.1965), the retirement of James Billington as Librarian of Congress, and the US Court of Appeals decision in favor of Google Books. Eliciting jeers were the Ad-blocker controversy, the behavior of Proquest (with Amanda dissenting), and the news that Jennifer Howard has left the higher education beat.

Much of what the group predicted for 2015 came to pass, to some extent: universities were hacked; SHARE developed; the push to learn to code continued; and Proquest and Gale moved to provide data mining access to their collections (at considerable additional cost to libraries). And, with the FAA moving to require that drones be registered, Mills’s prediction from 2013 that an Amazon drone will be shot down over Texas looks ever more likely. If you are impressed by those predictions, then in 2016 you should expect the Wu Tang Clan album to leak, Virtual Reality MOOCs to be launched, a digital humanist to win a Macarthur Fellowship, hypothes.is not to take off (or to enjoy the same success as DPLA), and emojis to replace text as our primary form of communication.

Related Links:

Running time: 59:23

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Categorized under Library of Congress, MOOCs, NEH, open access, privacy, Proquest, year in review

Episode #115 – The Mills is in Basel Edition

6 October, 2015No comments

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The regulars (Stephen, Tom, Amanda, and Dan) are back for a new semester and a new season of Digital Campus in which we wave to Mills as he jaunts about Europe. We also talk about some of the summer and early autumn’s big news, including the NEH ODH’s project directors meeting, the 50th anniversary of the NEH, Librarian of Congress James Billington’s retirement, and the George Mason University History Department’s new digital dissertation guidelines. Other mentions include:

– UConn historical musical instruments project
– John Donne’s 1622 sermon for Gunpowder Day: Virtual Paul’s Cross Project
– NEH Anniversary Message from President Obama
NEH Funding Levels, American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Check back in two weeks for more from the world of digital humanities, libraries, and museums and to see where Mills lands on another episode of Digital Campus.

Running time: 47:32

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Categorized under conferences, digital dissertations, libraries, Library of Congress, NEH, open access, repositories

Episode #114 – What to do with your (digital) scholarship

11 May, 2015No comments

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On this episode — #114, not #115 as Stephen mistakenly claims in the introduction — the full crew of regulars, Dan Cohen, Amanda French, Stephen Robertson and Tom Scheinfeldt discuss the MLA’s new repository, the AHA’s draft guidelines for assessing digital scholarship, and the tenth anniversary of YouTube. But first Dan talked about his visit to the White House, and Amanda described her new job as Director of Research and Informatics for the Virginia Tech Libraries. And Mills needed to know, did Dan wear an Apple watch to meet the President?

Related Links:

Open e-books initiative (or Dan goes to the White House) 

White House Fact Sheet

DPLA Blog Post

MLA CORE

MLA Commons Open Repository Exchange

Humanities CORE NEH-ODH Start-up Grant

AHA Guides on Assessing Digital Scholarship

AHA Blog Post

Guidelines for the Professional Evaluation of Digital Scholarship in History (PDF)

YouTube’s Tenth Anniversary

The very first YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jNQXAC9IVRw

Matt Schiavenza, “How YouTube Changed Journalism,” The Atlantic (February 14, 2015)

 

Running time: 52:24

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Categorized under Apple Watch, ebooks, libraries, open access, publishing, repositories, tenure and promotion, YouTube

Episode #107 — An Easter Basket of Hugs

7 October, 2014No comments

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In this episode, regulars Mills Kelly, Dan Cohen, and Stephen Robertson were joined by special guest Sharon Leon, the Director of Public Projects at RRCHNM, along with the digital history fellows, Amanda Reagan and Stephanie Seal.  We picked up where we left off last week with a discussion about Twitter and academic freedom after the dismissal of tenured professor Steven Salaita from the University of Illinois. Then we moved to a discussion on the future of Learning Management Systems and their role in academic institutions, as well as praise for the new online journal JSTOR Daily. Our last topic of discussion surrounded the ever ongoing question of whether or not those in the digital humanities should to learn how to code.  This conversation was spurred by the new platform Exercism that teaches users to code by encouraging more experienced programmers to provide feedback on a user’s code.   We wrapped up the discussion with news from Sharon Leon about upcoming Omeka enhancements, upgrades, and features.

 

Links:

Academic Freedom and Twitter

Educause Learning Management Systems Report

JSTOR Daily 

Exercism.io

Omeka Enhancements, Upgrades, and New Features

Running time: 55:25
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Categorized under Blackboard, digital humanities, freedom of speech, GitHub, journals, JSTOR, Omeka, open access, open source, programming, social networking, Twitter

Episode #105–Open Libraries and Open Syllabi

28 April, 20141 comment

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In the absence of Amanda French, Dan, Tom, Mills and Stephen were assisted by only two Amandas.  Tom and Stephen kicked off this podcast with a discussion of new rules for the electronic management of government records and the implications of these new rules for transparency and historical access.  We then heard Dan’s thoughts on the Open Syllabus Project, which resulted in a discussion about how educators share or borrow from each others syllabi.  One of the questions raised was whether or not syllabus writers can claim copyright over their content, which segued nicely into a discussion of Blackboard’s new open source policies.  Our group noted open sourced does not necessarily mean open access.  Finally, the group celebrated the first birthday of the Digital Public Library of America and congratulated Dan on its success.

Big Changes in Store for the Future Management of Government Records

Blackboard’s acquisition of open source software

Open Syllabus Project

Udacity charges for certificates

DPLA’s 1st Birthday 

 

Running time: 41:38
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Categorized under archives, Blackboard, course management systems, DPLA, MOOCs, NARA, open access, open source, syllabi, teaching

Episode 103 – Big Data to Big Business

7 March, 20144 comments

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In this episode the usual suspects, Mills, Stephen, Amanda, Dan and Tom gathered for yet another lively discussion. The episode began with a discussion on the trend toward opening data as several big players, the Getty, Twitter, Microsoft and the Public Library of Science took steps toward greater accessibility of their resources. The hosts also highlighted the subject of virtual conference attendance, looking at the “dopplebot” conference attendance model. From big changes to a historical look back, the group switched gears to discuss a Pew Report that looks back at 25 years of internet use, broad discussion of changes and how the internet has become an indispensable facet of our lives. Nothing demonstrates that more than the next topic of discussion, the $19 billion dollar purchase of WhatsApp.

They were joined by Sharon Leon, director of Public Projects at CHNM for an announcement about two upcoming summer institutes at CHNM for Art Historians and American Historians.

Related Links:

Opening access to data

Virtual Conference attendance:

PewReport – http://www.pewinternet.org/2014/02/27/summary-of-findings-3

WhatsApp acquisition for $19 billion

Sharon updates on Art Historians & American Historians institutes

Running time: 41:08
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Categorized under conferences, data, Facebook, Library of Congress, museums, open access, Twitter

Episode #102 – Digital Campus on 2013 and the Uncertain Future of Amazon’s Drones

18 December, 2013No comments

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In this year-end roundup/predictions episode of our Digital Campus podcast, Stephen and special guest Sharon Leon jumped in on this year’s cheers and jeers, listing the best and worst stories and events of 2013, including praise for expansion of DH centers and digital collections, as well as critiques of Elsevier‘s recent actions and the impact of the government shutdown on educational institutions. Tom, Mills, Amanda, and Dan then reviewed the successes (there were a few!) and failures (oh, MOOCs…) of their respective predictions for 2013.

Once they’d finished assigning grades and debating near-misses, the group invited Sharon and Digital History Fellow Amanda Regan to join in on putting together a set of alternately optimistic and depressing predictions for 2014. Judging from these predictions, this coming year looks good for grad students working on digital dissertations and for those interested in expanding open access, but Amazon’s drones might want to look into bulletproof casings.

Special thanks to multimedia whiz Chris Preperato for the plethora of pertinent sound effects in this episode, as well as for ongoing work on the podcast.

Links:

Cheers:

Jeers:

Predictions for 2013:

Predictions for 2014:

 

Running time: 50:48
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Categorized under Amazon, books, copyright, digital humanities, ebooks, Elsevier, Google, JSTOR, MOOCs, open access, publishing, year in review

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