Archive forTwitter

Episode #110 – 2014 in Review

19 December, 2014No comments

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

‘Twas the last podcast of 2014 and on this episode of Digital Campus, Amanda, Tom, Dan, and Stephen discussed their “Cheers and Jeers” for the year (with RRCHNM Digital History Fellow Amanda Regan filling in for Mills).  MLA, IMLS, FCC, and the lack of a government shutdown won the praise of the group, but Twitter could not stand up to the pressures of 2014.

After describing the good and the bad of the year, the group discussed their predictions from 2013.  While Mills’s prediction that an Amazon drone would be shot out of the sky in Texas did not come true, it appears that many of the predictions made by the group last year were pretty close–even though Dan gave himself a solid “B”.  With 2015 quickly approaching, everyone discussed their latest predictions for the new year and where the digital humanities are headed in the next 365 days.

Running time: 48:22

Download the .mp3

Categorized under programming, Twitter, year in review

Episode #107 — An Easter Basket of Hugs

7 October, 2014No comments

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

In this episode, regulars Mills Kelly, Dan Cohen, and Stephen Robertson were joined by special guest Sharon Leon, the Director of Public Projects at RRCHNM, along with the digital history fellows, Amanda Reagan and Stephanie Seal.  We picked up where we left off last week with a discussion about Twitter and academic freedom after the dismissal of tenured professor Steven Salaita from the University of Illinois. Then we moved to a discussion on the future of Learning Management Systems and their role in academic institutions, as well as praise for the new online journal JSTOR Daily. Our last topic of discussion surrounded the ever ongoing question of whether or not those in the digital humanities should to learn how to code.  This conversation was spurred by the new platform Exercism that teaches users to code by encouraging more experienced programmers to provide feedback on a user’s code.   We wrapped up the discussion with news from Sharon Leon about upcoming Omeka enhancements, upgrades, and features.

 

Links:

Academic Freedom and Twitter

Educause Learning Management Systems Report

JSTOR Daily 

Exercism.io

Omeka Enhancements, Upgrades, and New Features

Running time: 55:25
Download the .mp3

Categorized under Blackboard, digital humanities, freedom of speech, GitHub, journals, JSTOR, Omeka, open access, open source, programming, social networking, Twitter

Episode #106 – Back to the Future of Digital Humanities

15 September, 20144 comments

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Stephen Robertson hosted this episode and was joined by the whole crew of Dan Cohen, Amanda French, Mills Kelly, and Tom Scheinfeldt, as well as the digital history fellows, Anne Ladyem McDivitt and Alyssa Toby Fahringer, as producers. Important upcoming trends in digital humanities and educational technology were discussed, as well as the ongoing struggles of utilizing technologies on campus and their value to academia. The conversation then moved to the changing nature of Twitter. The group debated the usefulness of Twitter and the purpose it fulfills in an academic environment. Dan also laments his struggles with being the go-to historian for Answers.com.

Changes in Twitter

Straumsheim, Carl. “Twitter Has the Chatter.” Inside Higher Ed. August 19, 2014.
https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2014/08/19/study-scholars-are-present-professional-networks-engage-twitter
Chimero, Frank. “From the Porch to the Street.” August 26, 2014. http://frankchimero.com/blog/from-the-porch-to-the-street/

Jacobs, Alan. “The End of Big Twitter.” The New Atlantis. August 31, 2014. http://text-patterns.thenewatlantis.com/2014/08/the-end-of-big-twitter.html

Priego, Ernesto. “On the Public Humanities and the Reign of Opinion.” August 26, 2014. http://epriego.wordpress.com/2014/08/26/on-the-public-humanities-and-the-reign-of-opinion/

Rybak, Chuck. “DH Toe Dip: The Serendip-o-matic” August 28, 2014. http://www.sadiron.com/dh-toe-dip-the-serendip-o-matic/

Bright, Peter. “Twitpic to Shut Down Picture Sharing Service After Trademark Dispute with Twitter.” September 4, 2014. http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2014/09/twitpic-to-shut-down-picture-sharing-service-after-trademark-dispute-with-twitter/

Jim Groom of Reclaim Hosting responded via blogpost to Tom Scheinfeldt’s suggestion that digital media cannot be taught in an online capacity: “Catching Up with Reclaim Hosting”

Running time: 45:57
Download the .mp3

Categorized under social networking, teaching, Twitter

Episode 103 – Big Data to Big Business

7 March, 20144 comments

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

In this episode the usual suspects, Mills, Stephen, Amanda, Dan and Tom gathered for yet another lively discussion. The episode began with a discussion on the trend toward opening data as several big players, the Getty, Twitter, Microsoft and the Public Library of Science took steps toward greater accessibility of their resources. The hosts also highlighted the subject of virtual conference attendance, looking at the “dopplebot” conference attendance model. From big changes to a historical look back, the group switched gears to discuss a Pew Report that looks back at 25 years of internet use, broad discussion of changes and how the internet has become an indispensable facet of our lives. Nothing demonstrates that more than the next topic of discussion, the $19 billion dollar purchase of WhatsApp.

They were joined by Sharon Leon, director of Public Projects at CHNM for an announcement about two upcoming summer institutes at CHNM for Art Historians and American Historians.

Related Links:

Opening access to data

Virtual Conference attendance:

PewReport – http://www.pewinternet.org/2014/02/27/summary-of-findings-3

WhatsApp acquisition for $19 billion

Sharon updates on Art Historians & American Historians institutes

Running time: 41:08
Download the .mp3

Categorized under conferences, data, Facebook, Library of Congress, museums, open access, Twitter

Episode #100 — The Best and Worst of 2007

8 November, 2013No comments

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

For our hundredth anniversary episode, the digital history fellows divided up the 2007 episodes of Digital Campus and picked their favorite bits — listen to the result if you dare, and be transported back to the days when the iPhone was brand new, when Second Life was the Next Big Thing, and when you had to have an email address with a .edu TLD in order to use Facebook. Good times.

Many thanks to digital history fellows Ben Hurwitz, Jannelle Legg, Anne McDivitt, Amanda Morgan, Amanda Regan, and Spencer Roberts for choosing the clips, and many many thanks to audiovisual guru Chris Preperato for stitching them together.

 

Running time: 58:13
Download the .mp3

Categorized under Amazon, Android, Apple, archives, awards, Blackboard, blogs, books, browsers, BuddyPress, cloud computing, conferences, copyright, course management systems, digital humanities, DPLA, ebooks, Elsevier, email, Facebook, Flickr, freedom of speech, funding, Google, gossip, hardware, intellectual property, iPad, iPhone, journals, JSTOR, law, libraries, Library of Congress, linked open data, Linux, maps, Microsoft, mobile, MOOCs, Mozilla, museums, NEH, net neutrality, netbooks, Omeka, open access, open source, Pinterest, podcasting, privacy, programming, public domain, publishing, reading, search, social networking, sustainability, teaching, tenure and promotion, Tumblr, Twitter, unconferences, video, virtual worlds, web 2.0, web applications, Wikipedia, wikis, WordPress, Yahoo!, year in review, YouTube

Episode #98 — 500 in Podcast Years

16 September, 2013No comments

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Digital Campus is back! In the inaugural episode of the 2013-2014 school year, Tom, Dan, Mills, and Amanda welcomed RRCHNM’s new director Stephen Robertson and two of the Digital History Fellows, Amanda Morton and Amanda Regan. We began with the union between Google and edX, and the potential for change in the way that MOOC platforms are chosen, a discussion that included brief thoughts on Google Apps for Education and the collection of data on education. Moving on, we looked at the launch of a new platform for iPhone called Oyster, which offers a Netflix-like service for ebooks. The discussion revolved around what this new service might mean for the current state of textbook rental, deals with publishers, and efforts to combat the rising costs of textbooks. Mills suggested the possibility of a flat fee for a subscription to a semester worth of textbooks instead of students paying individually for ebooks.  We dug deeper into this topic with a discussion of the current state of ebook purchase and rental, citing the Kindle borrowing program as well as libraries’ offering ebooks through the Overdrive platform, and we wondered whether ebook subscriptions could be compared to movie and television streaming through services like Netflix and Amazon Instant Video.

Finally, we took a quick look at Topsy, an analytical service that allows users to search tweets from the earliest days of Twitter, an option that brings up interesting questions about how historians (and educators!) can use Twitter as a historical source. There was some suggestion that the release of this tool might be connected to Twitter’s IPO offering.

This episode concluded with a briefing on the state of the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media by the new director Stephen Robertson, which marks the introduction of a new segment narcissistically titled “Reports from the Center.” Tune in two weeks from now (we promise) for more.
Links:

Related links:

Running time: 45:49
Download the .mp3

Categorized under Amazon, copyright, course management systems, ebooks, Google, iPhone, libraries, MOOCs, open access, publishing, social networking, Twitter

Episode 90 – Back to School Special

10 September, 20124 comments

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

It’s time for a new school year and another year of news and views from the Digital Campus regulars and irregulars. Tom, Mills, Amanda, and Dan are joined by Audrey Watters and Bryan Alexander to do a post-mortem on the “summer of MOOCs” and a pre-mortem on the Twitter-esque service App.net. (With Mills finally joining Twitter over the summer it was time for the rest of us to leave.) We also make our picks for the hardware that you’ll see everywhere on campuses this fall–if we were doing the buying.

Links mentioned on the podcast:

Stefan Fatsis knows a lot about team handball
Dozens of Plagiarism Incidents Are Reported in Coursera’s Free Online Courses
Principles of Macroeconomics: The Online Version
App.net
Glenn Fleishman on what App.net could be
Only 250 users of App.net have generated half of the posts
Amazon to Apple: the game starts now
Microsoft Surface

Running time: 49:36
Download the .mp3

Categorized under Amazon, hardware, Microsoft, MOOCs, social networking, teaching, Twitter

Subscribe to Digital Campus Follow us on Twitter

Hosts

One could spend hours listening to these witty, modern podcasts.

American Historical Association Today

Credits

Categories

Archives

Courtesy of