Archive forTwitter

Episode 84 – The One Where We Didn’t Say G****e

16 April, 20121 comment

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

This week we consider the question of whether Apple and five major publishers colluded to fix e-book prices and the prospect of a Department of Justice Anti-trust suit against them. We also argue the question of whether buy-in from Blackboard will be good or bad for open source learning management projects Moodle and Sakai and join the chorus of praise lauding the online release of the 1940 U.S. Census. On the lighter side, we check in on the ongoing saga of @FakeElsevier. Finally, we celebrate our unintentional, but surely very welcome, neglect of a certain not-evil web search and services company.

Late update: Since we recorded this episode on April 4, 2012, the DOJ showed its hand and officially filed suit against Apple and its partners in the publishing industry, announcing terms of a possible settlement with at least three publishers.

Other links mentioned on the podcast:
Bigger Than Agency, Bigger Than E-Books: The Case Against Apple and Publishers
Blackboard Buys 2 Leading Supporters of Open-Source Competitor Moodle
Fake Elsevier’s complaints about academic publishing leads to fake takedown notice
Big Day for Family History Hunters: 1940 U.S. Census Is Online

Running time: 45:38
Download the .mp3

Categorized under Apple, Blackboard, course management systems, ebooks, Elsevier, iPad, law, Microsoft, publishing, social networking, Twitter

Episode 66 – The End of Big Search As We Know It?

22 February, 20117 comments

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

In this edition of the podcast Tom, Amanda, Dan, and Mills considered whether recent news stories about spammers gaming the Google search engine algorithm herald the end of big search as we know it. Is it really the case that Google engineers are being out-coded by their counterparts at “content farms” and other spam generating locations? And if they are, what does that mean for educators, students, and cultural institutions like museums, libraries, and archives? We also looked at Q&A site Quora (we weren’t bowled over) and Google Art Project (everyone but Tom was bowled over).

Running time: 37:09
Download the .mp3

Categorized under digital humanities, Google, Twitter

Episode 55 – Social History

21 April, 20104 comments

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Bryan Alexander of NITLE joins Tom, Mills, and Dan for a spirited discussion about what this week’s news about three services used by many educators–Twitter, Facebook, and Ning–tells us about how faculty and students should approach online services. We dig into the meaning of the Twitter archive going to the Library of Congress, Facebook announcing how it will spread to the rest of the web, and Ning closing its doors to non-profits. Many questions are raised (and a few answered) about the significance of social media becoming a dominant part of our online existence.

Links mentioned on the podcast:
Library of Congress Acquires Entire Twitter Archive
Facebook Launches New Privacy Section That May Make Your Head Hurt
National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program
Pew on Social Media and Young Adults
Dan on sustainability in last section of “The Idols of Scholarly Publishing

Running time: 52:50
Download the .mp3

Categorized under Facebook, privacy, sustainability, Twitter

Episode 54 – Birds in the Background

8 April, 20101 comment

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Mills, Tom, and Dan welcome Lisa Spiro back to the podcast to talk about the much ballyhooed launch of Apple’s iPad, the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals decision against “net neutrality,” and—to the sounds of spring’s first robin song twittering through Mills’ open window—the role of the Twitter backchannel at the University of Virginia’s recent Shape of Things to Come conference. Other stories include the National Endowment for the Humanities announcement of 18 Digital Humanities Start-up Grants and Yale’s decision to delay its switch to Gmail.

Links mentioned on the podcast:

David Pogue’s New York Times review of the iPad
In Our Time, “The City”
New NEH Digital Start Up Grants at edwired.org
JISC crowdsourcing projects
Integrating Digital Papyrology Project
Civil War Washington

Running time: 1:06:50
Download the .mp3

Categorized under digital humanities, email, Google, iPad, net neutrality, sustainability, Twitter

Episode 49 – The Twouble with Twecklers

7 December, 20095 comments

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Does Twitter make conferences more productive, less hierarchical, and more friendly, or does it just give new voice to confidence-crushing comments from the peanut gallery? Steve joins Mills, Dan, and Tom to talk about the phenomenon of “twecklers” and Google’s efforts to speed up the Web, including a SPDY internet protocol, a new DNS (Domain Name System) service, and a new systems programming language. And, by popular demand, we bring back our picks of the podcast.

Links mentioned on the podcast:
Danah Boyd on Twecklers
Conference Humiliation from the Chronicle of Higher Education
The Overbite Project brings Gopher to Firefox
The Art of Community, by Jono Bacon
Readability
Zotero File Storage

Running Time: 53:53
Download the mp3

Categorized under Google, Twitter

Episode 46 – Theremin Dreams

28 October, 20094 comments

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

How and why do a critical mass of people adopt new technologies such as virtual worlds or the Theremin? That’s just one of the issues we discuss on a freewheeling podcast featuring another two “irregulars,” Steve Ramsey and Bryan Alexander. The news roundup includes an analysis of the Nook and the Droid, among other oddly-named devices, and an exploration of what real-time search could do for researchers.

Running time: 54:10
Download the .mp3

Categorized under Android, books, search, Twitter

Episode 41 – Interview With Stan Katz

30 April, 20094 comments

While Tom was out on paternity leave, Dan and Mills took the opportunity to interview Stan Katz (Princeton University). For those who don’t know Stan, he is the past president of the American Council of Learned Societies, an accomplished legal historian and Vice President for Research of the American Historical Association, and a lifetime Chicago Cubs fan. Stan is also, in many ways, one of the fathers of digital humanities. In the interview he discusses the past, the present, and the future of digital humanities from a perspective few can offer. We also ripped our way through the news of the past two weeks, including the incredible news that spending time on Facebook can lower your grades. Who knew?

Other links mentioned on the podcast:
Crowdsourcing on Twitter
The Twitter Revolution That Wasn’t

Running time: 48:15
Download the .mp3

Categorized under digital humanities, Facebook, social networking, Twitter

Subscribe to Digital Campus Follow us on Twitter

Hosts

One could spend hours listening to these witty, modern podcasts.

American Historical Association Today

Credits

Categories

Archives

Courtesy of