Episode 97 — Digital Potato Library of America

1 April, 20133 comments

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In another single-topic Digital Campus, we react to the news that Dan is headed to the Digital Public Library of America as its Executive Director (no tears, no tears) by forcing him to tell us all about it. Special guests on the podcast include Berkman Center and DPLA Technical Workstream member David Weinberger, author of Too Big to Know and Everything is Miscellaneous as well as Nicholas Carr, author of The Shallows and The Big Switch. Issues raised include Internet centralization, the future of public libraries, and Mr. Potato Head.

Links
Nicholas Carr, “The Library of Utopia,” MIT Technology Review, April 25, 2012. Available at http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/427628/the-library-of-utopia/

Running time: 49:45
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Categorized under archives, DPLA, ebooks, libraries, museums, open access, public domain, sustainability

Episode 96 — The Olds and the New

4 March, 20134 comments

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In this edition of Digital Campus, Tom, Dan, and Mills (Amanda was on a beach somewhere when we were recording) ventured into strange and wild paths of the Internet previously unknown to us, thereby proving that we are, indeed, old in Internet years. After years of talking about Google, Apple, Facebook, and Wikipedia, we set aside those old school web platforms to examine Pinterest and Tumblr. How might humanists, archivists, librarians, and museum professionals make good use of these sites that had (largely) been off our radar all this time? And we wondered whether the fact that traffic on Pinterest now rivals that on Twitter and the growing evidence that young people are moving away from Facebook to services like Tumblr might mean that those of us in the digital humanities ought to be taking a much closer look at how to best utilize these platforms. We also took a look at the 2012 Digital Humanities Award winners and offered up a few favorites from among the many worthy winners and runners up for those awards.

Links:
Maine Historical Society’s Pinterest site
Alan Jacob’s Tumblr blog
2012 Digital Humanities Awards

Running time: 37:02
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Categorized under awards, digital humanities, museums, Pinterest, social networking, Tumblr

Episode 95 – MLA, AHA, and Aaron Swartz

1 February, 20132 comments

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One episode closer to the century mark, Amanda, Dan, Mills, and Tom welcome Kathleen Fitzpatrick and Tim Carmody for a debriefing on digital developments at the annual meetings of the MLA and AHA and a discussion of the tragic suicide of programmer and activist Aaron Swartz.

Links mentioned on the podcast:

Dan Cohen, Digital History at the 2013 AHA Meeting
Mark Sample, Digital Humanities at MLA 2013
MLA Commons
Aaron Swartz (Wikipedia)
Tim Carmody, Memory to myth: tracing Aaron Swartz through the 21st century

Running time: 58:04
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Categorized under conferences, copyright, digital humanities, intellectual property, journals, JSTOR, law, libraries, open access

Episode 94 – The 2012 Campies

18 December, 2012No comments

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Sure, there are a few talented people who have gotten EGOTs (an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony), but has anyone gotten a CEGOT? Find out who the lucky recipients of Campies are this year, awarded to the best and the worst in the world of technology and academia. Tom, Mills, Amanda, and Dan make their selections, as well as their predictions for 2013. The Digital Campus crew has often been right in the past, so be sure to tune in and know the future. (Past performance is no guarantee of future results.)

Links mentioned on the podcast:
Tumblr growth
Peter Brantley, “You Have Two, Maybe Three, Years
Lorcan Dempsey, “Thirteen Ways of Looking at Libraries, Discovery, and the Catalog: Scale, Workflow, Attention
Calling a Quorum — for Real
Buffeted by the Web, but Now Riding It
Amazon Is a Great Company Because It Has the Most Generous Shareholders in the World

Running time: 56:50
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Categorized under Amazon, digital humanities, ebooks, Facebook, funding, Google, libraries, mobile, MOOCs, open access, publishing, teaching, year in review

Episode 93 — A JSTOR and Jerry Springer Thanksgiving

20 November, 20122 comments

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What we do is news, of course (of course!), and so is what our friends do, and so is what “Friends of the Court” do. In the warm and friendly spirit of Thanksgiving, then, the four regular Digital Campus commentators (Mills, Dan, Tom, and Amanda) focus mainly on what you might call local news. First we address the decidedly non-local implications of JSTOR’s announcement that it will provide free access to a small community of Wikipedia editors, but then we get down into the news from closer to home. We’re pleased at the release of “Commons in a Box,” a turnkey open source blogging and social networking package built on BuddyPress by our buddies at CUNY Academic Commons, and we’re similarly pleased about the implementation of similar BuddyPress technology on the website for THATCamp, The Humanities and Technology Camp. We then hear reports from pundit Mills and troublemaker Dan about the Future of Higher Education Conference that recently took place at GMU, where passions ran as high as on your average daytime talk show. Dan ends by telling us all bit about a recent contribution he made to the question of whether the Authors’ Guild can be said to speak for academic authors, and then we adjourn, headed over the river and through the woods.

Links mentioned in the podcast:

Running time: 46:29
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Categorized under BuddyPress, conferences, JSTOR, MOOCs, open source, social networking, unconferences, Wikipedia, WordPress

Episode 92 – After the Storm

2 November, 20122 comments

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The regulars welcome the new month with a discussion of last month’s emphatic district court ruling in favor of HathiTrust in the Authors Guild’s copyright infringement case against the digital library project. We also discuss the potential and potential pitfalls of the ORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor ID) project and the official launch of Windows 8. We close with a discussion of (what else?) Star Wars.

Links mentioned on the podcast:

ā€˜Uā€™ wins copyright lawsuit against Hathitrust digitalization project, The Michigan Daily
A Legal Sweep, Inside Higher Ed
ORCID Launches Registry
What’s In A Name, Melissa Terras’s Blog
How to Make Windows 8 Look Like Windows 7, CNET UK
Why Is Dad So Mad
Weird Al, The Saga Begins [YouTube]

Running time: 38:27
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With very best wishes to our listeners and friends affected by Sandy — Tom, Amanda, Dan, and Mills

Categorized under copyright, hardware, law, libraries, Microsoft, open access

Episode 91 — The Black Helicopter Edition

15 October, 2012No comments

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While President Obama spoke on the other side of campus and the security helicopters buzzed the Digital Campus studio, Tom, Dan, and Mills (Amanda was at a secure and undisclosed location–so undisclosed we couldn’t get her on the show) discussed Dan’s iPhone fetish–yes, he has an iPhone 5–and what the constantly changing landscape of new devices like the iPhone 5 might mean for the humanities. We also breathed a huge sigh of relief that one part of the never ending litigation over Google’s book scanning project has come to an end. If only it were the last chapter in that saga! Is it news that Facebook now has more than 1 billion users? Or that they are using your tagging of family and friends to improve their facial recognition algorithms? Give the podcast a listen to find out what we thought about these topics and more.

Links mentioned in the podcast:

Google’s book settlement website
Google buying Viewdle
A newly discovered photograph of Emily Dickinson
Facebook tops 1 billion
A humorous analysis of the Facebook Billion

 

Running time: 44:54
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Categorized under Apple, copyright, Facebook, Google, iPhone

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