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Episode #115 – The Mills is in Basel Edition

6 October, 2015No comments

The regulars (Stephen, Tom, Amanda, and Dan) are back for a new semester and a new season of Digital Campus in which we wave to Mills as he jaunts about Europe. We also talk about some of the summer and early autumn’s big news, including the NEH ODH’s project directors meeting, the 50th anniversary of the NEH, Librarian of Congress James Billington’s retirement, and the George Mason University History Department’s new digital dissertation guidelines. Other mentions include:

– UConn historical musical instruments project
– John Donne’s 1622 sermon for Gunpowder Day: Virtual Paul’s Cross Project
– NEH Anniversary Message from President Obama
NEH Funding Levels, American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Check back in two weeks for more from the world of digital humanities, libraries, and museums and to see where Mills lands on another episode of Digital Campus.

Running time: 47:32

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Categorized under conferences, digital dissertations, libraries, Library of Congress, NEH, open access, repositories

Podcast #111 – The Next Big Thing

23 February, 2015No comments

After a long break, our podcast regulars, Stephen Robertson and Mills Kelly, were led by Amanda French in our first 2015 podcast. After a quick check-in on their current projects, the group kicked it off with a review of the winter academic conferences. Next, they discussed the announcement that Stanford University Press was awarded funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for the publishing of interactive scholarly works. On the subject of digital scholarship, Amanda mentioned the Humanities Open Book project which was recently funded by both the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the Mellon Foundation. Shifting the discussion to pedagogy, Mills addressed the way in which students may engage with the humanities differently through wearable computing. This podcast was produced by Digital History Fellows Jordan Bratt and Jannelle Legg.

Links:

Stanford University Press

Humanities Open Book

Gluejar

Wearable Computing

Internet of Things

Running time: 45:27

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Categorized under awards, books, conferences, digital humanities, publishing

Episode #109 – What Do Fabio and Naked Laptops Have in Common?

18 November, 20141 comment

This Digital Campus episode was recorded live by Chris Preperato during Friday’s second afternoon session of the RRCHNM’s 20th Anniversary Conference and was produced by Anne Ladyem McDivitt and Alyssa Toby Fahringer. Mills Kelly, Stephen Robertson, and Tom Scheinfeldt joined host Dan Cohen to recap the earlier sessions of the day, including discussions on failure, ECHO, History Makers, pedagogy, and digital humanities centers’ websites. The floor was opened for a question and answer session, and audience participants and those on Twitter asked about Tom’s laptop’s dearth of stickers, how to convey scholarship to a broad audience, and gender and digital history centers.

Links:
Gender and Digital History Centers Google Doc

RRCHNM20 Friday schedule

#RRCHNM20 Twitter stream

RRCHNM20 site

RRCHNM20 Omeka

Running time: 48:10

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Categorized under blogs, conferences, digital humanities, unconferences

Episode 103 – Big Data to Big Business

7 March, 20144 comments

In this episode the usual suspects, Mills, Stephen, Amanda, Dan and Tom gathered for yet another lively discussion. The episode began with a discussion on the trend toward opening data as several big players, the Getty, Twitter, Microsoft and the Public Library of Science took steps toward greater accessibility of their resources. The hosts also highlighted the subject of virtual conference attendance, looking at the “dopplebot” conference attendance model. From big changes to a historical look back, the group switched gears to discuss a Pew Report that looks back at 25 years of internet use, broad discussion of changes and how the internet has become an indispensable facet of our lives. Nothing demonstrates that more than the next topic of discussion, the $19 billion dollar purchase of WhatsApp.

They were joined by Sharon Leon, director of Public Projects at CHNM for an announcement about two upcoming summer institutes at CHNM for Art Historians and American Historians.

Related Links:

Opening access to data

Virtual Conference attendance:

PewReport – http://www.pewinternet.org/2014/02/27/summary-of-findings-3

WhatsApp acquisition for $19 billion

Sharon updates on Art Historians & American Historians institutes

Running time: 41:08
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Categorized under conferences, data, Facebook, Library of Congress, museums, open access, Twitter

Episode #100 — The Best and Worst of 2007

8 November, 2013No comments

For our hundredth anniversary episode, the digital history fellows divided up the 2007 episodes of Digital Campus and picked their favorite bits — listen to the result if you dare, and be transported back to the days when the iPhone was brand new, when Second Life was the Next Big Thing, and when you had to have an email address with a .edu TLD in order to use Facebook. Good times.

Many thanks to digital history fellows Ben Hurwitz, Jannelle Legg, Anne McDivitt, Amanda Morgan, Amanda Regan, and Spencer Roberts for choosing the clips, and many many thanks to audiovisual guru Chris Preperato for stitching them together.

 

Running time: 58:13
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Categorized under Amazon, Android, Apple, archives, awards, Blackboard, blogs, books, browsers, BuddyPress, cloud computing, conferences, copyright, course management systems, digital humanities, DPLA, ebooks, Elsevier, email, Facebook, Flickr, freedom of speech, funding, Google, gossip, hardware, intellectual property, iPad, iPhone, journals, JSTOR, law, libraries, Library of Congress, linked open data, Linux, maps, Microsoft, mobile, MOOCs, Mozilla, museums, NEH, net neutrality, netbooks, Omeka, open access, open source, Pinterest, podcasting, privacy, programming, public domain, publishing, reading, search, social networking, sustainability, teaching, tenure and promotion, Tumblr, Twitter, unconferences, video, virtual worlds, web 2.0, web applications, Wikipedia, wikis, WordPress, Yahoo!, year in review, YouTube

Episode 95 – MLA, AHA, and Aaron Swartz

1 February, 20132 comments

One episode closer to the century mark, Amanda, Dan, Mills, and Tom welcome Kathleen Fitzpatrick and Tim Carmody for a debriefing on digital developments at the annual meetings of the MLA and AHA and a discussion of the tragic suicide of programmer and activist Aaron Swartz.

Links mentioned on the podcast:

Dan Cohen, Digital History at the 2013 AHA Meeting
Mark Sample, Digital Humanities at MLA 2013
MLA Commons
Aaron Swartz (Wikipedia)
Tim Carmody, Memory to myth: tracing Aaron Swartz through the 21st century

Running time: 58:04
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Categorized under conferences, copyright, digital humanities, intellectual property, journals, JSTOR, law, libraries, open access

Episode 93 — A JSTOR and Jerry Springer Thanksgiving

20 November, 20122 comments

What we do is news, of course (of course!), and so is what our friends do, and so is what “Friends of the Court” do. In the warm and friendly spirit of Thanksgiving, then, the four regular Digital Campus commentators (Mills, Dan, Tom, and Amanda) focus mainly on what you might call local news. First we address the decidedly non-local implications of JSTOR’s announcement that it will provide free access to a small community of Wikipedia editors, but then we get down into the news from closer to home. We’re pleased at the release of “Commons in a Box,” a turnkey open source blogging and social networking package built on BuddyPress by our buddies at CUNY Academic Commons, and we’re similarly pleased about the implementation of similar BuddyPress technology on the website for THATCamp, The Humanities and Technology Camp. We then hear reports from pundit Mills and troublemaker Dan about the Future of Higher Education Conference that recently took place at GMU, where passions ran as high as on your average daytime talk show. Dan ends by telling us all bit about a recent contribution he made to the question of whether the Authors’ Guild can be said to speak for academic authors, and then we adjourn, headed over the river and through the woods.

Links mentioned in the podcast:

Running time: 46:29
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Categorized under BuddyPress, conferences, JSTOR, MOOCs, open source, social networking, unconferences, Wikipedia, WordPress

Episode 88 – Live from THATCamp Prime 2012

20 June, 20122 comments

Our second annual live podcast from THATCamp Prime was as fun as the first, full of audience questions and comments in addition to our normal discussion of the news from the prior two weeks. We talked about new models of science publishing and contrasted those models with what’s going on in the humanities, mentioned the French settlement with the Google Books project, and detailed the first five digital things we look at in the morning. Mills also debriefed us on the blowback from his historical hoax class. There’s also a recorded video of the podcast over at Ustream, although viewers should be forewarned that 1) in the first few minutes you can’t hear any audio and 2) you get to see our bare legs.

Links mentioned on the podcast:
First 5
PeerJ
French Publisher Group Strikes Deal With Google Over E-Books

Running time: 51:11
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Categorized under conferences, Google, publishing, unconferences

Episode 78 – Death Knell for the Paywall

2 December, 20111 comment

The clock strikes noon, and that sound might just signal the end of the bright morning for closed systems in higher education. On this week’s podcast, we discuss Coursekit, a free (for now) learning management system built by dropouts from the University of Pennsylvania; Commons-in-a-Box, a free (funded by the Sloan Foundation) academic social networking system of blogs and wikis that will be built by non-dropouts from the CUNY Academic Commons; and the Berlin 9 Open Access Conference, which seems to have convinced not only several universities but also the White House that peer-reviewed scholarly publications should be, what else, free. Our honored guest is journalist Audrey Watters of Hack Education.

Links

What Does Coursekit Say About the Future of the LMS?
“Commons in a Box” and the Importance of Open Academic Networks
Beyond the Iron Triangle: Containing the Cost of College and Student Debt
Berlin 9 Open Access Conference
Open Access Policy Adopted at Princeton
Open Access to Knowledge at Wesleyan
Request for Information on Public Access to Digital Data and Scientific Publications (submit your comments by January 2, 2012)
HASTAC Annual Meeting 2011

Running time: 50:35
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Categorized under Blackboard, blogs, conferences, course management systems, intellectual property, journals, open access, publishing, social networking, teaching, wikis

Episode 65 – Conference Season

25 January, 20111 comment

It’s January, and that means air travel, interviews, ball rooms, and exhibit halls. This year Digital Campus recognizes conference season with an extended discussion of digital humanities at the annual meetings of the American Historical Association (AHA) and the Modern Language Association (MLA). We also take time to discuss the latest tech news coming out of Las Vegas and the Consumer Electronics Show (CES).

Links to stories covered in the podcast:

Dan Cohen, Digital History at AHA 2011
Mark Sample, Digtital Humanities at MLA 2011
Pannapacker at MLA: Digital Humanities Triumphant?
Steve Ramsay, On Building
Android at CES: strong growth as platform jumps to new devices
iPad 2 Rumor Roundup
6 Top Smartphone Apps to Improve Teaching
14-year old developer takes top spot in App Store
Lua programming language
Google App Inventor for Android

Running time: 48:04
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Categorized under Android, conferences, digital humanities, iPad, iPhone

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